Bedtime. Just about every parenting book advises parents to establish a regular bedtime routine. Ours has been pretty much the same since our children were born - bath time, books, then bedtime. Recently, I noticed the dynamic changing a bit. My children still take a nightly bath and we still read books, but now that both of the kids can read, they want to read to us instead!  My five year old daughter still snuggles up on my lap, but my soon-to-be eight year old son no longer fits (although he occasionally tries). I think we must look something like this!

A scene from Elf (2003) featuring Will Ferrell and Bob Newhart

A scene from Elf (2003) featuring Will Ferrell and Bob Newhart

Although things have changed, bedtime is still a special part of our day.  My friend and colleague, Edith Hope Fine, has captured the joy, wonder, and beauty of bedtime in her latest book, Sleepytime Me (Random House, May 2014). I asked Edith to stop by to tell us about herself and her latest book.

Cover of Sleepytime Me

Cover of Sleepytime Me

What made you want to write for children?

I've been "reading" since I was maybe four and alphabet savvy. To my father's horror, I carefully spelled out, "N-O-R-T-H-E-R-N  T-I-S-S-U-E" and proclaimed, "Toilet paper!" I read voraciously as a kid and remember one bad night when I was at the end of my bed reading Nancy Drew in a patch of light from the hallway. Someone turned the light off. I think it took me half an hour to get brave enough to crawl up the bed and under the covers for safety. Tapping childhood memories and feelings, plus years of teaching and reading books aloud to my students and my own darlings, all led me to writing for children.

What inspired you to write Sleepytime Me?

There's nothing in the world like holding a baby or grand baby and reading aloud. I'd nailed a title, Yawn Around Town, and a rhythmic refrain, "Yawn around, yawn around the sleepytime town," back in the early 90's. I'd yawn while writing, a good sign for parents in a bedtime story, that's for sure. And we all know yawns are catching. (I yawned just now thinking about it--of course I'm an owl and it's close to midnight.) Sleepytime Me (oh-HO, I hadn't nailed the title) comes out from Random House this May. Yikes. Two decades. I gasped when I saw Christopher Denise's gorgeous illustrations. You can see samples at his website and on his blog. I'll be doing a "come in your p.j.s reading" at Yellow Book Road here in San Diego in May. Wear your fuzzy slippers.

My favorite image from Sleepytime Me from Christopher Denise's website

My favorite image from Sleepytime Me from Christopher Denise's website

Tell me about the revision process. Sleepytime Me has changed radically since its inception, no?

I love revision. Well, the end of revision. Yes, I tried a bunch of different ideas, from community helpers yawning to a yawn that showed on the page. What??!! None felt right. None worked. After starting with a manuscript of 1000+ words, I ended up with poetry and 132 words. Talk about paring.

What advice do you have for aspiring authors?

I taught writing for children with Judith Josephson through SDSU Extension for almost 20 years. There's so much to learn. I run the published members' group of our San Diego SCBWI (Society of Children's Writers and Illustrators) and somehow people find my name and ask me to meet them for coffee so I can tell them how to publish their book. The truth is that a person really wanting to write for children is doing her homework--reading in the field, talking with librarians, scouring bookstore bookshelves, joining SCBWI, entering writing contests, taking classes, and attending conferences. My best advice is don't just think about writing for kids. Start. Write. Write right now. Today. 

What can we expect next from you?

Besides the monthly Grammar Patrol column for eFrog Press, I have two big projects on my plate right now (besides the teetery stack of 20 different half-baked manuscripts waiting for me to turn up the oven). I'm writing an eBook for tyro-novice-rookie folks who ache to write for children--the things that took me two years to figure out, they can learn in two minutes. Jump, Froggies! will be out this spring through eFrog Press. 

The other is a student workbook to accompany my Cryptomania! Teleporting into Greek and Latin with the CryptoKids. As you know, I'm happy with my nose in a dictionary, thesaurus, or etymological dictionary, so the workbook has 100 extra roots in addition to the 200 basic Greek and Latin roots covered in the book. I pulled from my years of teaching to conjure up pages from which kids in grades 3–6 can learn cool roots that they'll use the rest of their lives--through high school and college and beyond. A huge undertaking, the pages have now been copy edited and are with the graphic designer and artist Kim Doner, who illustrated the book, for the spot art. Look at this adorable preview sketch of Alphy, the Microcyanosaurus in Greco-Roman garb! What a hoot.

Alphy, the Microcyanosaurus

Alphy, the Microcyanosaurus

Thank you, Edith!

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